PRNewser Gets New Digs!

December 6, 2007

That’s right folks, “mama bistro” as our sister blog AgencySpy likes to call her, has decided to move us on over to the main site. Starting today, catch us at www.prnewser.com. Let us know what you think of the new feel.

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Top shelf booze and tuna tartar flowed freely last night at the annual movable media feast that is the Ken Sunshine holiday party, or, the Ken Sunshine & Shawn Sachs party as this is the first year Ken is hosting with a partner.

With a last-minute change (jokingly pawned off as a smokescreen to keep Rudy Giuliani from crashing) the party landed at Meatpacking hotspot One Little West 12th.

I spoke to the gregarious Sachs about the ‘plan’ for a party that put Ben Affleck, Pat O’Brien, John Mayer, media elite including Page6’s Paula Froelich & Bill Hoffman, the News’ George Rush, and GMA’s Monica Escobedo in the same mix as clients 1199SEIU, America’s Second Harvest, New York Organ Donor Network, Do Something and the Transit Workers Union.

(Hoffman, incidentally was overheard talking about the great items publicists could be pitching from books and such but don’t, and that “a lot of flacks should be sent to flack school.”)

According to Sachs, “It’s simple really, we let the staff invite whoever they want from the different parts of the business. Some agency holiday parties are staff only, we open it up to everyone, including other PR people we know. Other agencies have staff-only parties. Who needs to spend more time with people from the office?”

The other benefit beyond plying the media with posh nightclub surroundings is putting like-minded clients together, Sachs continued. “The Second Harvest people talked to Do Something about the current food shortage. They’re meeting today to see how they can raise awareness together.”

Others confirmed on the scene were Access Hollywood producer Jennifer Zweben, Pete Shapiro, former owner of the Wetlands, and new owner of Brooklyn Bowl, GMA’s publicist Bridgette Maney, and of course our boss, mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby.

2008 Predictions, Already?

December 5, 2007


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It’s that time of year again. Along with all of the holiday parties (we’re still recovering from one last night, more on that later) both media and pr people attempt to look into their crystal balls and predict “what’s next.”

The PR Meets Marketing blog recently posted their 2008 trends list, including some from Tom Pick of Web Market Central. We were reading along, mostly agreeing, until we ran into this: “PR professionals will reach out to bloggers in different ways, beyond just pitching press releases.” Our take: if it’s taken you until 2008 to realize you should be reaching out to bloggers in “different ways” you’ve got your work cut out for you.

On another note, Blip.tv spoke with BusinessWeek’s Jon Fine about his predictions for 2008. While taking funny jab at himself for being wrong on a few past predictions (cough, Katie Couric, cough) Fine does provide some interesting food for thought, including his prediction that Google will start buying content companies. You can view the video here.

What are your predictions? We’ll keep this list going as we roll into 2008, so send us links to your own posts, or email us: prnewser at mediabistro.com.


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Continuing in our weekly series interviewing the movers and shakers in PR and media, PRNewser this week spoke with Marketwatch.com senior media columnist Jon Friedman. In his most recent column, “R.I.P., the American magazine, 1923-20__” Jon wrote, “this industry seems intent on choking itself to death.” We talk to him a bit more about that, working with “flacks” and his local sports affiliations.

 

 

What time did you wake up this morning?

5:45 a.m. (to get ready to go to a 6:30 a.m. spinning class at a nearby New York Sports Club).

 

 

Best part about covering the media beat?

Chiding and needling pompous people.

 

 

Worst part about covering the media beat?

Seeing how incredibly thin-skinned and image-conscious media people at all levels can be – they are much worse about protecting their reps than CEOs.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Vlogging and the New DIY PR

December 4, 2007

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(image: Andy Plesser shooting footage for The New York Times corporate site)

I’ve been talking to people in the industry about the fight for marketing dollars recently between interactive agencies, PR firms, and other consultants. Where PR people succeed and fail–and this was the main theme of the Critical Issues Forum–is in their ability to tell compelling stories. My theory is the overall nut of marketing dollars will remain the same, while PR firms fight to keep what they have, or learn new methods and take a bigger chunk. Creating new media, specifically producing video for the web is going to be the nut the industry fights for.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
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But shouldn’t it be the other way around, you say?  Not necessarily.  Bulldog Reporter’s Sally Falkow recently spoke with marketing guru Seth Godin, who said:

The main challenge for PR is that the Internet has made the model of pitching the media redundant. The best PR people are those who are counsellors to their clients, not publicity hounds. The way to win now is to represent the new media to your clients, not the other way round.

It’s true that when you really know a certain publication/writer that you can speak to your client with confidence about what will work best for both parties.  In essence, you are pitching the media outlet to your client.  Try that on for size!

Do You Get Paid Per Hit?

December 4, 2007

We just came across this question on LinkedIn:

My business, <name removed> has been working with a small PR firm for the past 2 years on a ‘fee per placement’ agreement. I have a line of new products and they would like to change this structure to a monthly retainer. Does moving to a monthly retainer make sense and how do I know what is reasonable to pay on a monthly basis?

Ok, so asking how much a monthly retainer one should pay, based on scope of work needed, is a totally reasonable question. But, we always cringe when we hear of firms who offer a “pay per hit” arrangement.  What would you say when put in this situation?  Tell the potential client to skee-daddle, sign ‘em up, or somewhere in between?

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